Colin Tudge’s Great Re‑Think

This website is intended to identify and develop the ideas needed to rescue humanity and our fellow creatures from what is now the brink of total disaster — for if only we did conceptually simple things well then we and our fellow creatures could still be looking forward to a long and glorious future: the next million years for starters.

Recent articles from the Blog

Anchovies

 by 

Continuing the subject of Not Much Meat, Suzanne considers little things that punch way above their weight in terms of flavour.

Follow-on Dishes

 by 

Follow-on dishes are rooted in the frugal habits of peasant cookery and frequently use less meat than the original dish. They should be part of the natural rhythm of cooking.

The Unintended Consequences of Eating Less Meat.

 by 

Against a barrage of calls to cut our meat consumption I believe there have been some unintended consequences that work against most people’s desire to eat more responsibly.

The road to renaissance

 by 

Nothing short of a cross-the-board transformation – Renaissance — is needed to rescue the world from its present decline. But, says Colin Tudge, we first need to lay the foundations Truly the world needs Renaissance – re-birth. We, humanity, need to re-think everything we do and take for granted from first principles and start again, … Read more

The Big Idea

The Big Idea is divided into the following chapters: 

The pic — of me (CT) among some of John Letts’ Heritage wheat in Buckinghamshire — encapsulates some of the prime themes of The Great Re-Think. For John raises genetically diverse cereals on soils of low fertility year-on-year: no fertilizer, no pesticide, no herbicide, no digging, no fallow, and all wonderfully wildlife-friendly: key principles of agroecology applied to arable. All this is the complete opposite of the modern, industrial trend — monocultures of uniform crops chemicalized to the hilt. To rescue the world at this late hour we need to apply such radical thinking to all aspects of life.

Colin Tudge among some of John Letts’s Heritage wheat in Buckinghamshire

Recent comments